The Round Table (Rational Pagans Forum)

Science & The Supernatural: A Discussion of the World Around us - Based on Science with an Interest in the Supernatural ...
It is currently 09 Aug 2020, 00:31

All times are UTC - 5 hours


Forum rules


Please note: Discussion here should be relatively civil. Attack the post, not the poster. Thanks!



Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 3 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: 03 Apr 2010, 12:13 
Offline
Adherent

Joined: 24 Mar 2010, 15:01
Posts: 95
Is God/Jesus giving God/Jesus to God/Jesus, giving a sacrifice?

I follow God the father on this issue and think as He does.


If you give you to you, do you gain? No.
Do you lose? No

If you do not lose or give up something, are you giving a sacrifice?
No.

Conclusion. No sacrifice.


Why have you forsaken me is answered here.

Pro 21:3 To do justice and judgment [is] more acceptable to the LORD than sacrifice.

The vicarious sacrifice of Jesus was refused by God.
No scapegoat Jesus.
As it should have been.
It was immoral.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D7UImBPq ... feature=iv

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e4dANEsd5so

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n2xceAHN ... re=related

Regards
DL


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 05 Apr 2010, 10:47 
Offline
'Lustrous Potentate
User avatar

Joined: 24 Mar 2010, 11:06
Posts: 411
The whole concept of subtitutionary atonement was already being questioned by the time of the prophets. And the idea of another human paying the price for one's own sin was specifically repudiated.

Quote:
"The son shall not suffer for the iniquity of the father, nor the father suffer for the iniquity of the son; the righteousness of the righteous shall be upon himself, and the wickedness of the wicked shall be upon himself." (Ezekiel 18:20)

Maimonides commented that performing sacrifices was something that the Israelites wanted, and that God permitted it, but then gradually weaned them away from it. Fundamentalist Jews today disregard this, wishing to rebuild the temple in Jerusalem and resume animal sacrifice.

There were two primary theological responses to the destruction of the second temple. It was still believed that sin needed to be atoned for. The Pharisees, whose school developed into rabbinic Judaism in the centuries after the destruction of the temple, replaced sacrifice with prayer and good works. The basis for this theology was developed over the preceding centuries during the Babylonian captivity, when there was no temple available for sacrifices, and also in the diaspora, where Jews lived with no access to the temple. The Christian movement grafted mystery religion mythology onto a Jewish root, and replaced ongoing animal sacrifices with the "one time for all" sacrifice of a dying-and-resurrecting god-man savior.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 06 Apr 2010, 08:24 
Offline
Adherent

Joined: 24 Mar 2010, 15:01
Posts: 95
Zebulon wrote:
The whole concept of subtitutionary atonement was already being questioned by the time of the prophets. And the idea of another human paying the price for one's own sin was specifically repudiated.

Quote:
"The son shall not suffer for the iniquity of the father, nor the father suffer for the iniquity of the son; the righteousness of the righteous shall be upon himself, and the wickedness of the wicked shall be upon himself." (Ezekiel 18:20)

Maimonides commented that performing sacrifices was something that the Israelites wanted, and that God permitted it, but then gradually weaned them away from it. Fundamentalist Jews today disregard this, wishing to rebuild the temple in Jerusalem and resume animal sacrifice.

There were two primary theological responses to the destruction of the second temple. It was still believed that sin needed to be atoned for. The Pharisees, whose school developed into rabbinic Judaism in the centuries after the destruction of the temple, replaced sacrifice with prayer and good works. The basis for this theology was developed over the preceding centuries during the Babylonian captivity, when there was no temple available for sacrifices, and also in the diaspora, where Jews lived with no access to the temple. The Christian movement grafted mystery religion mythology onto a Jewish root, and replaced ongoing animal sacrifices with the "one time for all" sacrifice of a dying-and-resurrecting god-man savior.


Yes. Yet that quote says that sacrifice is not required as we are all responsible for ourselves. The right thing.

Regards
DL


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 3 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 5 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group